Side Seated Angle Pose

Side seated angle pose is an excellent yoga posture for improving balance and opening up your hips. This pose can be a bit challenging at first, but you’ll be able to hold it for longer with practice. The pose is a great way to stretch your groin and inner thighs, and it can also help relieve lower back pain. Read on to find out more!

Basics of Side Seated Angle Pose

The Side Seated Angle Yoga Pose, also known as Ardha Chandrasana in Sanskrit, is a basic but effective yoga pose targeting glutes, hamstrings, and quadriceps. This pose is recommended for beginners. The pose is a great way to improve your balance and stability. The deep-seated twist also stretches and tones the spine, hips, and abs. It can be beneficial for digestion.

Benefits of Side Seated Angle Pose

The benefits of side seated angle include increased flexibility, improved balance, and better circulation. This pose also stretches the groin, hips, and thighs.

In Side Seated Angle Pose, you recline on your side, with your leg stacked one on top of the other. This pose is excellent for stretching and opening your hips, and calming the mind. 

Additionally, Side Seated Angle Pose can help improve digestion and relieve tension in the neck and shoulders. It is a great pose to do in the morning or evening.

How to do Side Seated Angle Pose

1. Sit on the floor with your legs straight out.

2. Bend your right knee and place your foot flat on the floor next to your left hip.

3. Reach your right hand behind your back and clasp your left hand around it.

4. Inhale and lift your torso up and away from your thigh.

5. Look up at your left hand and extend through your left arm.

6. Hold for 5 breaths, then release the clasp and switch sides.

There you have it! A simple guide on how to do Side Seated Angle Pose. Be sure to practice regularly to reap all the benefits this pose. Namaste!

Common Mistakes 

When doing Side Seated Angle Pose, it is common to make mistakes that affect the pose’s effectiveness. Below are other mistakes:

1. Not sitting up tall enough: When doing this pose, be sure to sit up tall with your spine lengthened. 

2. Not reaching your arm straight: When reaching your arm up, be sure to put it straight up towards the ceiling. This will help you open up your chest and get the most out of the pose.

3. Not holding the pose for long enough: To get the full benefits of this pose, be sure to hold it for at least 30 seconds. This will help you stretch your chest and hips.

4. Letting your shoulders slump forward: When doing this pose, be sure to keep your shoulders back and down. This will help you maintain the correct alignment of the pose.

5. Bending your knees too much: When doing this pose, be sure to keep your knees bent as little as possible. This will help you maintain the correct alignment of the pose.

6. Letting your head hang down: When doing this pose, be sure to keep your head in line with your spine. This will help you maintain the correct alignment of the pose.

7. Not engaging your core: When doing this pose, be sure to engage your core muscles. This will help you maintain the correct alignment of the pose.

8. Not breathing deeply: When doing this pose, be sure to breathe deeply. This will help you stretch your chest and hips.

9. Holding your breath: Be sure to keep breathing throughout the entire pose. This will help you stay relaxed and maintain the correct alignment of the pose.

10. Moving out of the pose before you’re ready: Be sure to slowly move out of the pose when you’re ready. Don’t move out of the pose before you’re ready, as this can cause injuries.

Beginners’ tips

If you’re a beginner, it’s essential to start slowly in this pose. You can begin by reclining on your elbow instead of your forearm and then work your way up to reclining fully on your side. Below are additional tips:

1. Place your hand on the floor behind you, then reach your right arm overhead.

2. Try to keep your hips square to the front of the mat, and press your left hand and right foot into the floor.

3. Hold for 5-10 breaths, then switch sides.

Cautions

When doing Side Seated Angle Pose, be cautious if you have any of the following conditions: back pain, knee pain, hip pain, pregnancy, and glaucoma. Talk to your yoga instructor before performing this pose. Also, keep your spine long and tall. Breathe deeply and relax into the pose.

Variations

1. Modified Side Seated Angle Pose: This variation is excellent for beginners or those with tight hips. Sit sideways on your yoga mat, with the right hip pressed against the floor and the left leg crossed over the right. Put your hand on the floor just behind you and press down to lift your torso. Hold for 5-10 breaths, then switch sides.

2. Extended Side Seated Angle Pose: This variation is a great way to deepen your hip stretch. Sit sideways on your yoga mat, with the right hip pressed against the floor and the left leg crossed over the right. Put your hand on the floor and lean forward, extending the left arm and right leg out to the side. Hold for 5-10 breaths, then switch sides.

3. Seated Angle Pose with a Twist: This variation adds a twist to the stretch, which can help to open up the spine. Sit sideways on your yoga mat, with the right hip pressed against the floor and the left leg crossed over the right. Place your hands on the floor in front of you and lean forward, extending the left arm and right leg out to the side. Twist your torso to the right, bringing your left elbow towards your right knee. Hold for 5-10 breaths, then switch sides.

4. Half Camel Pose: This variation is a great way to open up the chest and stretch the back. Sit sideways on your yoga mat, with the right hip pressed against the floor and the left leg crossed over the right. Place your hands on the floor in front of you and lean forward, extending the left arm and right leg out to the side. Reach your arms up and back, and hold for 5-10 breaths. Then switch sides.

Mercy Maina

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References :


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